Jaguarundi (Herpailurus yagouaroundi) - Puma Lineage
Puma yaguarondi (Prague Zoo) by Bodlina (GFDL or CC BY-SA 3.0) via Wikimedia Commons

The strange looking Jaguarundi (Herpailurus or Puma yagouaroundi) ranges across Mexico, Central and South America and is now  considered extinct in the southern United States. Previously described with a number of subspecies, partly due to its different coat colors, recent DNA studies show the Jaguarundi is in fact a monotypic species.

As with most wild cats, habitat loss and fragmentation due to clearing of land for farming are the major threats, and studies show the cat is far less common than previously reported.

Puma Lineage

1. Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus)

2. Jaguarundi (Herpailurus yagouaroundi)

3. Puma / Mountain Lion (Puma concolor)

Unique Facts about Jaguarundis

~ Body shape similar to weasels ~

~  Plain coat with red and dark color morphs ~

~ Active during the day time ~

Jaguarundi (Herpailurus yagouaroundi) Classification

The Jaguarundi belongs to the genus Herpailurus (or Puma) and the full taxonomy or scientific classification of the Jaguarundi species is:

Kingdom: Animalia (animals)

 Phylum: Chordata (vertebrates)

  Class: Mammalia (mammals)

   Order: Carnivora (carnivores)

   Suborder: Feliformia (cat-like)

Family: Felidae (cats)

Subfamily: Felinae (small cats)

Genus: Herpailurus / Puma

Species: Herpailurus / Puma yagouaroundi (Jaguarundi)

    Subspecies: None

 

The scientific name for the Jaguarundi is Herpailurus yagouaroundi or Puma yagouaroundi; which is also known as the binomial name, species name, latin name, biological name or zoological name. Some use the term 'botanical name' however that term is only applicable to the plant kingdom (botany) and not the animal kingdom (zoology).

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Jaguarundi (Herpailurus yagouaroundi) Classification Diagram
Click chart to download.
Permission to use for personal or educational use.
Credit: www.wildcatfamily.com.

Jaguarundis allogrooming red and grey colour morph (Puma yagouroundi)

Jaguarundi (Herpailurus yagouaroundi) Subspecies

Lower classification

Up to eight subspecies of Jaguarundis have been described in the past:

  • Herpailurus yagouaroundi yagouaroundi
  • Herpailurus yagouaroundi ameghinoi
  • Herpailurus yagouaroundi cacomitli
  • Herpailurus yagouaroundi eyra

  • Herpailurus yagouaroundi fossata
  • Herpailurus yagouaroundi melantho
  • Herpailurus yagouaroundi panamensis
  • Herpailurus yagouaroundi tolteca

However according to the last Felidae taxonomic revision in 2017, DNA studies show no evidence to support these subspecies and the species is considered monotypic (no subspecies).

Jaguarundi Conservation

The global conservation status for the Jaguarundi is Least Concern (LC) however populations are declining.

The following organizations are dedicated to research and conservation of the smaller cats of Latin America:

Institute Pro-Carnivores - Wild Cats of Brazil

Small Wild Cat Conservation Foundation - Global

Please support these organizations with their important work if you can. No matter the size of your donation, every bit helps!


Past projects:

Jaguarundi kitten in tree roots (Puma yagouaroundi)

Jaguarundi resting on ground (Puma yagouaroundi)

Jaguarundi Facts and Information

The following websites have well researched and authoritative information on Jaguarundis:

Jaguarundi (Herpailurus yagouaroundi) Research

Here are some papers published on Jaguarundis. Click on the title bar to view the abstract and the link to the article.

View more articles on Jaguarundis in the IUCN Cat Specialist Group database (scroll down once the library page is loaded to see the list).

Consider joining the Friends of the Cat Specialist Group to access the full articles and receive their journal Cat News covering the latest wild cat research.

Jaguarundi grey colour morph (Herpailurus yagouaroundi)

Molecular population genetics, evolutionary biology and biological conservation of neotropical carnivores.

Field Guide to the Wild Cats of South America (Spanish)

Neotropical Cats by TG de Oliveira (1994)
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